Light Up My Night (Mason Jar Solar Lights)

Pinterest is all about instant gratification. Pin now, read later. More like pin now, never look at again. Somehow it makes you feel like you’ve accomplished plenty, when in fact you’ve only spent several hours browsing the internet dreaming about the things you’d like to accomplish and likely never will.

Pearce often gives me this look when I’m playing on Pinterest. There’s only one way I can justify this behaviour in his eyes, and that is to actually do the projects I pin on pinterest. Usually this involves cooking or baking or something food related.¬†However, this time I did something a little different.

Meet my first garden Pinterest project: the mason jar solar light.

Glowing mason jars

Can you believe you can pay $35 for a single mason jar solar light. As an avid home preserver I already own mason jars, so this project cost me $10 – $1 per solar light jar. Thank you Walmart.

I Googled a couple different tutorials and ended up just kind of winging it. Some people used bent paper clips to suspend the lights in the jars, others used duct tape. I ended up cutting square holes out of the lids, the size of the solar panel, and using double sided tape (the kind you scrapbook with) to suspend my lights. It didn’t work. I found some really thick and gooey double sided tape, kind of like the adhesive on the back of command hooks – that did the trick.

8779153578_d4b26d8627_o

8779159376_b6bbc9e7da_o

Advertisements

DIY Peanut Butter In A Food Processor

Is there any problem peanut butter can’t solve? I had no idea I could mill my own peanut butter using a food processor. Once again, kudos Pinterest.

I love the feeling of making something with my own two hands. I suppose it might be more satisfactory if I had grown the peanuts, shelled them and roasted them myself. Alas, I did not get so pioneer woman on this expedition.

I used honey roasted peanuts, although next time I will definitely be using plain roasted peanuts so I can really control the type of flavour in the end result. As such I am attaching a simple recipe which calls for plain dry roasted peanuts. You could theoretically use any type of peanut you like; if you have a fancy peanut store like Picard’s you could get your hands on any type of spiced or flavoured nut you can imagine. Who says peanut butter can’t be wild?

I digress. I have one word to describe my afternoon: delicious. Because there is nothing quite so yummy or capable of transporting me backwards 20 years into my childhood as a stalk of celery smothered in peanut butter.

Nine ounces of honey roasted peanuts just about filled a 1/2 pint canning jar. It took somewhere between 5 and 10 minutes to get the consistency I was happy with: a slightly grainy but not “crunchy” or “smooth” peanut butter. I didn’t have to add any ingredients because my peanut was flavoured, but a plain roasted peanut would require salt or honey/icing sugar to taste.

Peanuts

My little guy is terrified of the food processor. Every time I turn it on he cries bloody murder. I put him in the Ergo; problem solved

Ozzy

As the peanut is processed it will first breakdown into crumbs, which will begin to clump into a thick paste. Soon a doughy peanut butter ball will form. Don’t stop processing; the ball will smooth out as the peanut butter becomes more runny. At this point keep an eye on the progress if you are looking for a crunchier peanut butter. You may need to scrape down the sides with a larger amount of peanuts; I didn’t have to.

Processing peanut butter

Ooey gooey

Crunch. Crunch. Crunch.


Recipe for 1/2 pint jar:

  • 10 oz. dry roasted peanuts
  • 2 tbsp. icing sugar or honey
  • If using unsalted peanuts add salt to taste. I would start with 1/2 tsp. and add more if not salty enough.
  1. Measure ingredients into food processor.
  2. Process on high for 5-10 minutes. Check consistency.
  3. For creamy smooth peanut butter you may need to process for 15 or more minutes.
  4. Fill a sterilized canning jar, screw on lid and store in fridge for 4-6 weeks.

“As the peanut is processed it will first breakdown into crumbs, which will begin to clump into a thick paste. Soon a doughy peanut butter ball will form. Don’t stop processing; the ball will smooth out as the peanut butter becomes more runny. At this point keep an eye on the progress if you are looking for a crunchier peanut butter. You may need to scrape down the sides with a larger amount of peanuts; I didn’t have to.” – Jenny